Sacramento Solons


Current Season
Team History
All-Time Leaders    Batting    Pitching
League Championship Titles: 1927
Manager: Buddy Ryan
Ballpark: Moreing Park

Moreing Park   Opened: 1922  Capacity: 12,000
Riverside Boulevard and Broadway, Sacramento, California

AVG overall .992
LHB .999, RHB .988
Doubles 1.061
Triples 1.068
HR overall .810
LHB .862, RHB .782

Distances/wall heights
Left Field line 330 ft./20 ft.
Left Field 353 ft./20 ft.
Left-Center Field 377 ft./20 ft.
Center Field 436 ft./20 ft.
Right-Center 371 ft./20 ft.
Right Field 345 ft./10 ft.
Right Field line 330 ft./10 ft.

In the Redux

The Solons struggled throughout most of the 1920’s, never finishing above .500 until in 1927, when they put it all together to finish with the best record in the league, capping the season off with a sweep in the championship series. Last season they slipped to 78-76 but finished the season on a high note.

Real-life history

Sacramento has hosted professional baseball teams as far back as the 1880’s. From 1900-1902, the city had an entry in the California League, the forerunner of the PCL; the team was known alternatively as the Senators and the Gilt Edges. As the Sacramento Solons, they were charter members of the PCL in 1903; during this season they were also referred to as the Senators or the Sacts. The team failed to draw, and moved to Tacoma in 1904, where they were known as the Tigers. Their time in Tacoma was both short and eventful: they took the flag in ’04, won the first half of a split-season in ’05, and were back in Sacramento by the end of the 1905 campaign, finishing a game under .500 and then losing the post-season series to Los Angeles.

The Solons of 1942, the year they won their first and last PCL Championship.

In 1906 the team tried its luck as the Fresno Raisin Eaters. Failing to draw there as well, they moved back to Sacramento but dropped out of the PCL to play in the independent California League, at the time an all-Northern California loop. They returned to the PCL three years later, more or less officially adopting the name the Sacramento Sacts, but by 1914 attendance was so dismal the club moved to San Francisco in mid-season to compete with the Seals as the Mission Wolves. This too was a failure and the franchise took off for Salt Lake City after the season.

This rather manic fellow seems inspired by Warner Bros. cartoons of the ’40s…
...while this four-limbed edifice bears an obvious family resemblance to the Oaks’ Li’l Acorn (both mascots were created by the Oakland Tribune’s Lee Susman).

It didn’t take long for the PCL to return to the City of Trees, and a new franchise was awarded in in 1918. This team, known as the Senators, was purchased by Branch Rickey in 1935 and renamed the Solons. As a Cardinals farm club, they finally won a pennant in 1942. Although they had other strong finishes, the 1942 flag was to be their only one.

The Solons drew reasonably well until Major League Baseball moved to California in 1958. Unable to compete with the Giants, the club moved to Honolulu in 1961. Since then two distinct PCL franchises have called Sacramento home, including the current Sacramento River Cats. The old Solons franchise that had relocated to Hawaii is still in existence, known today as the Colorado Springs Sky Sox.